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, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
: boesh terse city across and shreveport louisiana. this lady that's on your show, what a breath of fresh air chongging to do right for us folks out here. god bless you. okay. my point is you've got to bear with me. christopher dodd was walking down the hallway on c-span cameras. they captured him saying this: why aren't you going to run for senate and his words were country why isn't going to let me. senator dodd and senator conrad both got some kind of loans through countrywide. senator conrad just retired and he didn't run for the senate. now those were his words. c-span has it on camera pity and i want to know if you have investigated them in any way. and thank god for c-span. >> host: thanks, charles. >> caller: let me >> guest: let me plant to things. we are working for everyone. if you ask me who i represent, i represent you. i represent everyone. because we all pay for this bailout and we are continuing to pay for the bailout. so i appreciate that. as to what we are investigating i have to be sensitive to the i will try to give as much transparency as i can. but i have federal age
was cutting through the middle of the city. with citizens of both sides fearing the brink of world war iii, freed wandered close to the boundary of the divided city. neither on assignment, nor with a predetermined vision who he ended up finding and seeing the most through his camera were american g.i.s. but here at the the wall in its nascent days, freed snapped a photograph of an unnamed black soldier standing at the edge of the american sector. freed's contact sheets from this trip confirm that this image was powerfully a single shot. taken at a middle distance in black and white, freed stands with his subject between a set of trolley tracks that culminate into the imposed boundary of the wall behind them. this encounter haunted freed. it set him off course and beckoned his return from exile to come back to america to confront segregation and racism. image would end up being the first photograph in "black and white america," and as ap annotation in the book, freed sets this out as its point of departure. he writes: we, he and i, two americans, we meet silently, and we part silently. impr
. and as has been noted, it may result in higher fares, fewer consumer choices, particularly in of and cities where to carriers over love. in retrospect, the effect of the mergers suggest that, in fact, fares did rise on some routes, where the two merger partners used to compete. given the size of the big three, legacy airlines that would remain after the merger, it's not entirely unreasonable to suggest that they would have even greater power to tacitly agree to raise prices. undermining price competition and harming consumers in the process. indeed, if american and u.s. airways were to merge, more than 70%, by some estimates as high as 86%, of the domestic airline industry would be controlled by just for airlines. i fear that the flying public will see relatively few benefits while bearing much of the cost of this potential merger. another related issue is whether the low-cost carriers can continue to provide effective, competitive pressure on what would be the big three legacy airlines, should this merger of her. .. against large legacy carriers. there's reason to wonder whether southwest
tv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> from new york city, now, michelle rhee, former chancellor of the d.c. public school system, recounts her career and present her thoughts on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> michelle, firstly, thank you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple busy days from last evening, jon stewart, cnn's piers morgan, and we're really delighted to have our old friends here from c-span filming this event so that many people from across the united states can benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. so just to kick start it this evening, michelle, how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book, "radical," and where does this interesting name come from? >> so i think the genesis of the name is an interesting one in that when i first got to d.c. it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation, and that was a pretty widely-known truth. and, um, so i started doing things that i thought were of course for a school district in that kind of state. i, you know, started clos
deputizing discrimination. this particular research study we did was for salt lake city, police chief burbank called us so bravely. he had built up in his house that was getting ready to pass, like most of us did, wanting to deputize his police officers and to make them immigration officers. and, of course, a lot of the language was pretty much you just don't stop anybody ask for their credentials and really say to you belong here. so most of us in law enforcement, we knew what that was going to do. you already don't trust us. let's do one more layer on top of that. so he had some grave concerns. and so what we did is one of the issues he had, all of his lawmakers were saying hey, if you do this, you will reduce crime because the association of crime and people of color was the only reason they're over here is to take our jobs, you're a member the arguments. when they bring their criminality into the system. so remember those conversations and to reflect back and say that sounds familiar, doesn't it? sounds very familiar. and the one of the things that he did was the cple went into the commit
there are some 130 cities that american airlines serve that u.s. airways doesn't serve, 62 cities u.s. there raise fares that american airlines doesn't serve. when we make decisions about serving in the market particularly small and medium-sized markets there is an economic calculus we undertake and that economic calculus involves determining whether revenue potential is and subtracting if you will be projected costs. we look at news service, one of the big costs are developing infrastructure, recruiting and training employees, creating a marketing presence in the community. in pennsylvania where there are a number of communities u.s. there raise fares and american airlines doesn't serve that infrastructure exists, we have quality employees there already and a great marketing presence. those are great opportunities for expanding service from the american airlines hub of. >> we're looking for opportunities to expand like johnstown, pa.. related facilities at u.s. there currently at pittsburgh included operations center that employs 1500 people. old americans has operations center in
pressure or -- [inaudible] in their real place per se. in the capital city. and the diplomacy with them and real life with them. in substance of how they behave at the u.n. we don't think the u.n. is that important. we don't wind up forcing them to take account of our positions on things many of which matter us. at least in the general assembly. we don't think it's worth the price we have to pay and the real world relationship with them in their own country. and we don't -- it means there's a disconnect between how we and our allies behave at the u.n. versus what our frequently far better relationships are directly in the capital. >> host: who are the new liberal realists you talk about in your book? >> guest: the obama administration came in split between two quite different camps. in the foreign policy. on the one hand you had a waive of people that i would describe typical describe liberal international. people believe in the mission of the u.n. to not just be the kind of diplomatic table where everybody negotiates and argues and debates and let's their views be known. something whic
and then travel to nuke city to run in a race in honor of a chicago police officer have been killed in the line of duty a year before. so on the evening of march -- may 19, thomas the tank our parents house when i left to show the pictures of police week activities. so he finished, they ate dinner and he went to lead. actually delete my father went with them to the door to walk met. i wasn't there obviously but according to reports this is what happened. two men approached thomas as he went to get on his motorcycle, pulled a gun on him and tried to take his motorcycle. now, thomas was a police officer so he was armed or told them he was a police officer. my dad, standing at the porch saw this happening to my dad was also armed. he had a gun and as. he went in the house to get the gun. he came back out. so there was an exchange of gunfire between the offenders, my brother and my father. when i got the call from my mother i had no idea how bad this wasn't. no idea. i just knew she was crying. she is a crier sometimes so i just knew i needed to get him. shortly after of the call traffic was stoppe
leavy in oklahoma city and public service as a u.s. magistrate in the western district of oklahoma. as evidence of his career and distinction, when judge bacharach was chosen to be a magistrate judge from a pool of many well-qualified candidates, the chief judge characterized the decision as an easy one. since that time, his colleagues have characterized his service as remarkable, demonstrating superb judicial temperament and a real asset to the western district family and the legal community. as with any position in the judicial branch that comes with a lifetime appointment, the senate must deliberate carefully, and we did and gave all the thought to this nominee, and as was shown and clearly demonstrated by a unanimous vote of confirmation. you don't see this very often but you saw it with judge bacharach. so i appreciate the opportunity to support him today and to have been able to call and be the first to congratulate him in this new part of his career, which we will be very, very proud and i can assure the chair and all the rest of them that this is a guy that we will always b
're working with states and cities who have filed lawsuits. and the other way to get that information is the result of lawsuits that have been filed, discrimination lawsuits. so that is some place you can start. but when you have national organizations who are willing, particularly black police officers, who are willing to step out on the front lines to give you that data and that information, i would encourage you to communicate with them. >> all right. well, this has been an extraordinarily informative panel and you see by the testimony so to speak of these experts that this is a vital and critical problem that we have to confront. and it has real consequences on actually existing people, on flesh and blood folk, most of whom are ours. whether black or latino or asian or indigenous people or the like. the reality is all of this intellectual and academic and cerebrally intense stuff we're talking about has application. that's no reason to dislodge the centrality of the academic and the abstract and the theory because the reality is, given what this panel has spoken about, and profess
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
it's indiscriminate killing, and in the old days you'd throw a rock over the walls of the city, and you didn't see who you killed. if the prophet muhammad used catapults, that means if he lived today, he would use nuclear weapons. people tend to say, oh, that's just religion, people are rational. which isn't quite true. religious fault lines in the middle east are critical. i think once iran goes nuclear, i think we're going to have a severe shia/sunni fortnight, threatening the sunni dominance in the world -- in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that a pakistani, a nuclear presence, a pakistani-extended deterrence in saudi arabia. the saudis finance the pakistani nuclear program. they have a prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that the pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this would, is going to raise a question regarding for the first time a pakistani second-strike capability against india which would certainly complicate the
of the world's international cities. people coming from all backgrounds. you are well placed to understand what immigration and the opportunities and contributions that immigrants and those who come to this country for a better opportunity can contribute. and i thank you so very much for your leadership and your presence here today. welcome, fellow texans. i yield back. >> i now turn to the former chairman of the committee and the gentleman from san antonio, texas. mr. smith, ford 15 seconds of welcome. >> yes, i would like to welcome the mayor. as we both know, san antonio is a wonderfully livable, tri-cultural city. and he has done a great job representing us in so many ways. i also want to say that i enjoyed serving with your brother in congress, who was sitting behind you as well. >> welcome to all of our witnesses, and we begin with mr. vivek wadhwa. >> thank you for letting me speak with you. being here in washington dc, everything about being here, we worry about china, whether they are going to be the road to the future. we worry about shortages and everything in the world. when you are
, in some of the larger cities and then some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online. that is pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content it was 40% of that comes from the united states. >> host: so that is the appetite? >> guest: there is appetite clearly. online streamers. >>ing are fresh should have content to have people cross over. >> al-jazeera purchased current tv in december last year. just month 1/2 ago. how about expanding the american audience. who will you reach right now? >> potentially estimated 50 million viewers. if you talk going 4 1/2 million homes to 50 million homes, obviously a great leap forrd -- forward. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the meshes. this opens some eyeballs to us and we hope we'll give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it from those that haven't seen it and provide another platform for the core audience that we already have. >> here are some facts about al-jazeera english channel. it is a 24 hour global news netwo
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city, and he was of a nice guy, and we started talking about what i do for a living. and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for political office. why, he said, which stumped me because in my business, in my world the question of why we need more women is not a question. nobody asks why, they just ask how do we get more women there. and he went on to say, he said i have two daughters, i have a wyoming, i have a mother -- a wife, i have a mother, and what can women do in office that i can't do? which was an interesting question. and he had no idea what a can of worms he was of opening by -- [laughter] getting into this conversation with me. because i really believe that no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong as if you have men and women legislating together. and i'm happy to say that in the years since i started doing this work, the world has really come around very much to this idea. and the idea is that we need to add women to leadership not
destroys city after city, destroyed washington, d.c., burned down the white house. next stop, baltimore but as they came into the chesapeake bay, the armada of ships, warships a source of the eye could see, it was looking grim. fort mchenry standing right there. general armistead who was in charge of fort mchenry had a large american flag commission to fly in front of the fort. the admiral in charge of the british fleet was offended and said take that flag down. you have until dusk until you take that flag and but if you don't we will reduce you to ashes. there was a young amateur poet on board by the name of francis scott key, sent by president madison to try to obtain the release of an american physician who was being held captive. he overheard the british plans they were not going to let them off the ship. he mourned as dusk approached. he more for his fledgling young nation. and as the sun set, then bartman's, missiles, so much debris, he strained trying to see was the flag still there? he couldn't see a thing. all night long a continued. at the crack of dawn he ran out to the banis
give them those tools under this tax -- child tax credit legislation. sanctuary cities reform would prohibit appropriated funds from being used in contravention of the illegal immigration reform and immigrant responsibility act of 1986. and i'm joined by senators grassley and senator fischer in that legislation. too many jurisdictions in the united states are self-proclaimed sanctuary cities, and by doing that they are in contravention of federal immigration law when they say they will not cooperate in the enforcement of that law in any way. that's unacceptable and those cities should not get appropriated funds. everify, i mentioned, is an initiative and legislation by senator grassley. i'm proud to join him as a coauthor. i'm an original cosponsor of that bill. it would take the present everify system and make it mandatory and expand it so that is our work force system of enforcement. everify works. the problem is, it's a pilot. it's not mandatory and it's not broad enough, and we need to broaden and make mandatory that workable everify system. the voter integrity protection act. i
, and we must thank the city of savannah department of cultural affairs, festival upon spores, members, and individual donors for their support. it is because of them that we are able to bring you these esteemed authors for free. if you enjoyed today's speakers and would like to make a donation to the festival, we've provided yellow buckets at the door when you exit. please consider giving to our bucket list for next year's gifted scribes. before we get started, i just have a couple of housekeeping notes for you. please take a moment to silence your cell phones. i had to do that myself. okay. immediately following his presentation, mr. gore will be signing copies of his book. please go to the fellowship hall which is located directly behind the pulpit, and you go out the doors and around, and a right turn as you enter the exit the sanctuary. there's volunteers outside to direct you. mr. gore will be able to sign 400 books, and you must have the numbered card that was included with your book purchase. your signing order will correspond with your card number, and you will be called in gr
like in the district with the college access program and city bridge, etc., there are certainly opportunities around yes which allows kids who graduate from certain cities to have their full college education paid for. again, what some on the panel have all said is how do we scale and replicate these to a far greater degree. in d.c. if you graduate from a high school, public or private, we essentially will subsidize, the taxpayers will, your going to any state college in the country and getting in-state rates. so lots of different strategies either to pay for school or to drive down costs, and i think probably lots more information needs to be disseminated but also leadership in your respective communities and what you can drive. taking some of those good examples whether it's city bridge or college access fund or the s.t.e.m. scholarship program in washington state, whatever, these are clearly doable with the right set of players and stakeholders coming together. >> yeah. that's absolutely right. we have time for, actually, one more question. so -- >> good morning. i am neil is
, a historian, author and professor of history at columbia university, and james stifel that city university of new york and the author of "freedom national" the topic of tonight's discussion. a book that was research at the new york public library at the center for scholars and writers and i was the director of libraries of the new york public library. >> our other panelists will sign books in the lobby after the program. please join me in welcoming to the stage. [applause] >> good evening. i'm glad to see all of you here. wonderful audience. we are going to have a conversation we hope discussing and then we will take questions from the audience. i am sure do have a lot and i hope he will not be shy about asking them. want to start first with a gem and asking a question about the book about the title of the book and some terms you used that people may not understand, freedom national. estimate it comes from a speech that charles sumner gave as a u.s. senator the speech was called the sectional and first there are two things. it's a constitutional doctrine the political revolution is in the
, it's not like you're a city or you're a county, or your state government or your household or your business. we budget off of projections in growth. so the task a year or so ago was for a group of six republicans and six democrats to come up with $1.2 trillion. it's beyond belief that that did not occur. so sequester was put in place as a mechanism to ensure that there at least was some slowing of growth. the first seven months of the sequester is the most ham-handed portion of it and it's cut at the p.p.a. level, it's across the board, and focused on two important categories. i agree that it's ham-handed and the only thing worse than sequestration in my opinion would be kicking the can down the road on some much-needed fiscal discipline here in washington. so i hope that would we'll do today is get behind a very thoughtful proposal that would say look, we're still going to reduce spending by this amount, but we're going to give the executive branch, because this first seven months is handled so differently than what happens after that --, after that, by the way, appropriators live
ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me. like, the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the guy -- i have to ask first. he's not here? then let's talk about him, okay
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
threat towards seoul, north korean, artillery pieces and rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul in a matter of minutes or a few hours, if the north koreans unleash this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence. to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very, very cognizant about this. another related issue in this connection though is that once north korea mounts nuclear warheads on its missiles, how is, how is that going to affect the retaliation policy? that was established between the united states and south korea in 2010, following the shelling of the young pong island in november of 2010. policy that in the future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily, if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. would support that kind of retaliation. what is going to happen to the u.s. and the rok attitude towards the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear war ahead on its missiles and can threaten to rain nuclear missiles down on south korea, if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to
york, i'm troubled about the emerging threats as new york city is a top tear row target. we have two missions for wmd under the national guard, cutting those programs, obviously, puts us at grave risk. we have a lot of national guard contingencies and operations throughout the state which is essential for recovery efforts. we saw what an amazing job they did in hurricane sandy so i'm very concerned that with these cuts, we expose ourselves to vulnerabilities. cyber threats is the greatest threat. we do a lot of work for them in the labs, and i'm worried about our training. obviously, it's one of the premier trading operations we have for the army, and we have to keep the resources available. i'd like you to briefly talk about if you can quantify, how are the risks now elevated because of the cuts? >> well, senator, i'll answer briefly and see if one of the chiefs, in terms of their service,ment to respond. you asked the right question. how is risk elevated? so what we provide a deterrent against enemies and assurance of the allies, and then where we can't do as much deterrence or ass
of raising 50 million sub-saharan africans out of poverty over the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. their grand parents ranches, farmers are having their own -- their own online dating service. and the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late paul harvey, was dodge rams heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. him what's that kenny chesney song? she thinks my tractor's sexy? you know, there's some truth to that. agricultural issues are, i would argue, sexy. if not sexy, increasingly critical and increasingly important. so i'm glad to be here and it's metaphorically appropriate that we are here today, because it turns out it was february 21, 1865, 148 years
that affliction communities close to country, from inner cities to rural areas to tribal lands. on a daily basis this unspeakable is compounded by individual tragedies that tapes on our street and decimate the lives of our children. every loss is shattering, and inexplicable. each one is an outrage and this is why, as concerned citizens, heartbroken parents and public servants empowered to make a difference on behalf of those we are swore to appropriation it's time for each of to us steel our revolve and renew or commitment to this end of senseless violence. at every level of this administration, and particularly at our nation's department of justice, my colleagues and i are determined to work with organizations like this one to build a bipartisan consensus for taking decisive action to end gun violence. and we will not rest until we've done everything in our power to prevent future tragedies like the one that took place at sandy hook elementary school. of course there will never be a simple, one size fits all solution for addressing any challenge of this magnitude. and confronting its underlyin
, and by his quiet city leadership of the church in uncertain times. people of all nations have been blessed by the sacrifice to sow the seeds of hope, justice and compassion throughout the world in the name of our lord and savior. again, that from house speaker john boehner. in about an hour we will be taking live to an alliance for health reform briefing on medicare policy and the future of the program for an overview looking at how medicare respond to the beneficiaries are, and what changes could occur once the health colossal implemented in 2014. we will have that live at 12:15 eastern on c-span2. the senate begins its work today at 2 p.m. eastern. they will continue work on the violence against women act which could reauthorize the bill for five years. last week senators agreed to consider six amendments to the bill and they will begin voting on those amendments today at 5:30 p.m. eastern. live coverage right here on c-span2. up next, a look at reconstruction in afghanistan. from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: on monday in a last hour of "washington journal" we take a loo
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
economies and even more specifically city economies. and similarly, it strikes me ma that when we talk about manufacturing as a category, that's a little overbroad, because manufacturing is, in fact, 1,000, million little subcategories that add up to this bls o bea category of manufacturing. you broke down and said here's what specific cities are doing well and can have lessons for the american economy in the aggregate. what are some specific manufacturing sub sectors that are the cutting leading edge that the rest of this super subsector can learn from? >> top 100 metros in the united states, they sit on 12% of our landmass, they're two-thirds of our population, three-quarters of our gdp, and on every asset and indicator that matters they're at 75%, 80%, 85%, 90% of national share. so it's really hard to talk about an american economy. you have to talk about a network of met meth rho poll tan economies and same throughout the rest of the world. for a long time i think we focused a lot on the consumption economy. you know, and a walmart is a walmart is a walmart. you know, whether it's in ph
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